Verschw Rung Gegen Amerika

Author : Philip Roth
ISBN : 9783446251311
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 29.25 MB
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Amerika 1940. Charles Lindbergh, Fliegerheld und Faschistenfreund, verbucht bei den Präsidentschaftswahlen einen erdrutschartigen Sieg über Franklin D. Roosevelt. Unter den amerikanischen Juden breitet sich Furcht und Schrecken aus - auch bei der Familie Roth in Newark. Aus der Sicht des 8-jährigen Philip schildert der Autor, was passiert wäre, wenn ...
Category: Fiction

Race Class And Gender In The United States

Author : Paula S. Rothenberg
ISBN : 0716761483
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 23.31 MB
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Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study presents students with a compelling, clear study of issues of race, gender, and sexuality within the context of class. Rothenberg deftly and consistently helps students analyze each phenomena, as well as the relationships among them, thereby deepening their understanding of each issue surrounding race and ethnicity.
Category: Social Science

Creating White Australia

Author : Jane Carey
ISBN : 9781920899424
Genre : Australia
File Size : 34.21 MB
Format : PDF
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The adoption of White Australia as government policy in 1901 demonstrates that whiteness was crucial to the ways in which the new nation of Australia was constituted. And yet, historians have largely overlooked whiteness in their studies of Australia¿s racial past. Creating White Australia takes a fresh approach to the question of 'race¿ in Australian history. It demonstrates that Australia¿s racial foundations can only be understood by recognising whiteness too as 'race¿. Including contributions from some of the leading as well as emerging scholars in Australian history, it breaks new ground by arguing that 'whiteness¿ was central to the racial ideologies which created the Australian nation.This book pursues the foundations of white Australia across diverse locales. It also situates the development of Australian whiteness within broader imperial and global influences. As the recent Apology to the Stolen Generations, the Northern Territory Intervention, and controversies over asylum seekers reveal, the legacies of these histories are still very much with us today.
Category: Australia

That Pride Of Race And Character

Author : Caroline E. Light
ISBN : 9781479835775
Genre : History
File Size : 76.55 MB
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“It has ever been the boast of the Jewish people, that they support their own poor,” declared Kentucky attorney Benjamin Franklin Jonas in 1856. “Their reasons are partly founded in religious necessity, and partly in that pride of race and character which has supported them through so many ages of trial and vicissitude.” In That Pride of Race and Character, Caroline E. Light examines the American Jewish tradition of benevolence and charity and explores its southern roots. Light provides a critical analysis of benevolence as it was inflected by regional ideals of race and gender, showing how a southern Jewish benevolent empire emerged in response to the combined pressures of post-Civil War devastation and the simultaneous influx of eastern European immigration. In an effort to combat the voices of anti-Semitism and nativism, established Jewish leaders developed a sophisticated and cutting-edge network of charities in the South to ensure that Jews took care of those considered “their own” while also proving themselves to be exemplary white citizens. Drawing from confidential case files and institutional records from various southern Jewish charities, the book relates how southern Jewish leaders and their immigrant clients negotiated the complexities of “fitting in” in a place and time of significant socio-political turbulence. Ultimately, the southern Jewish call to benevolence bore the particular imprint of the region’s racial mores and left behind a rich legacy.
Category: History

White By Law

Author : Ian Haney Lopez
ISBN : 081473698X
Genre : Law
File Size : 64.90 MB
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Ian Haney Lopez is a professor of law at the University of California, Berkeley.
Category: Law

Plucked

Author : Rebecca M. Herzig
ISBN : 9781479840250
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 50.2 MB
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From the clamshell razors and homemade lye depilatories used in colonial America to the diode lasers and prescription pharmaceuticals available today, Americans have used a staggering array of tools to remove hair deemed unsightly, unnatural, or excessive. This is true especially for women and girls; conservative estimates indicate that 99% of American women have tried hair removal, and at least 85% regularly remove hair from their faces, armpits, legs, and bikini lines. How and when does hair become a problem—what makes some growth “excessive”? Who or what separates the necessary from the superfluous? In Plucked, historian Rebecca Herzig addresses these questions about hair removal. She shows how, over time, dominant American beliefs about visible hair changed: where once elective hair removal was considered a “mutilation” practiced primarily by “savage” men, by the turn of the twentieth century, hair-free faces and limbs were expected for women. Visible hair growth—particularly on young, white women—came to be perceived as a sign of political extremism, sexual deviance, or mental illness. By the turn of the twenty-first century, more and more Americans were waxing, threading, shaving, or lasering themselves smooth. Herzig’s extraordinary account also reveals some of the collateral damages of the intensifying pursuit of hair-free skin. Moving beyond the experiences of particular patients or clients, Herzig describes the surprising histories of race, science, industry, and medicine behind today's hair-removing tools. Plucked is an unsettling, gripping, and original tale of the lengths to which Americans will go to remove hair.
Category: Social Science

The Color Of Wealth

Author : Barbara Robles
ISBN : 9781595585622
Genre : Business & Economics
File Size : 37.53 MB
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For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans. This accessible book—published in conjunction with one of the country’s leading economics education organizations—makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice. Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies—how, for example, many post–World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only—The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans’ net worth.
Category: Business & Economics

Raising Race Questions

Author : Ali Michael
ISBN : 9780807755990
Genre : Education
File Size : 68.22 MB
Format : PDF
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Raising Race Questions explores the opportunities and challenges that arise when White teachers are willing to deal directly with race and the role it plays in their classrooms. Based on lessons gleaned from experienced White teachers in a variety of settings, it lays out a path for using inquiry to develop sustained, productive engagement with challenging, and common, questions about race. It suggests that guilt and conflict need not be the end point of raising race questions and offers alternative destinations: anti-racist classrooms, positive racial identities, and a restoration of the wholeness that racism undermines. This book features: new insight on race and equity in education; case studies of expert and experienced White teachers who still have questions about race; approaches for talking about race in the K - 12 classroom; strategies for facilitating race conversations among adults; a variety of different resources useful in the teacher inquiry groups described in the book; and research with teachers, not on teachers, including written responses from each teacher whose classroom is featured in the book.
Category: Education

The Immigration Crucible

Author : Philip Kretsedemas
ISBN : 9780231527323
Genre : Law
File Size : 22.72 MB
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In the debate over U.S. immigration, all sides now support policy and practice that expand the parameters of enforcement. While immigration control forces lobby for intensifying enforcement for reasons that are transparently connected to their policy agenda, and pro-immigration forces favor the liberalization of migrant flows and more fluid labor market regulation, these transformations, meant to grow global trade and commerce networks, also enlarge the extralegal (or marginally legal) discretionary powers of the state and encourage a more enforcement-heavy governing agenda. Philip Kretsedemas examines these developments from several different perspectives; exploring recent trends in U.S. immigration policy, the rise in extralegal state power over the course of the twentieth century, and discourses on race, nation and cultural difference that have influenced the policy and academic discourse on immigration. He also analyzes the recent expansion of local immigration laws—including the controversial Arizona immigration law enacted in the summer of 2010—and explains how forms of extralegal discretionary authority have become more prevalent in federal immigration policy, making the dispersion of these local immigration laws possible. While connecting these extralegal state powers to a free flow position on immigration, he also observes how these same discretionary powers have historically been used to control racial minority populations (particularly African American populations under Jim Crow). This kind of discretionary authority often appeals to "states rights" arguments, recently revived by immigration control advocates to support the expansion of local immigration laws. Using these and other examples, Kretsedemas explains how both sides of the immigration debate have converged on the issue of enforcement and how, despite different interests, each faction has shaped the commonsense assumptions currently defining the scope and limits of the debate.
Category: Law