Power And Powerlessness

Author : John Gaventa
ISBN : 0252009851
Genre : History
File Size : 44.98 MB
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Explains to outsiders the conflicts between the financial interests of the coal and land companies, and the moral rights of the vulnerable mountaineers.
Category: History

Power And Powerlessness

Author : John Gaventa
ISBN : UCSC:32106010495338
Genre : History
File Size : 35.57 MB
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Category: History

Fighting King Coal

Author : Shannon Elizabeth Bell
ISBN : 9780262528801
Genre : Law
File Size : 53.36 MB
Format : PDF
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An examination of why so few people suffering from environmental hazards and pollution choose to participate in environmental justice movements.
Category: Law

Transforming Places

Author : Stephen L. Fisher
ISBN : 9780252093760
Genre : History
File Size : 74.83 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
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In this era of globalization's ruthless deracination, place attachments have become increasingly salient in collective mobilizations across the spectrum of politics. Like place-based activists in other resource-rich yet impoverished regions across the globe, Appalachians are contesting economic injustice, environmental degradation, and the anti-democratic power of elites. This collection of seventeen original essays by scholars and activists from a variety of backgrounds explores this wide range of oppositional politics, querying its successes, limitations, and impacts. The editors' critical introduction and conclusion integrate theories of place and space with analyses of organizations and events discussed by contributors. Transforming Places illuminates widely relevant lessons about building coalitions and movements with sufficient strength to challenge corporate-driven globalization. Contributors are Fran Ansley, Yaira Andrea Arias Soto, Dwight B. Billings, M. Kathryn Brown, Jeannette Butterworth, Paul Castelloe, Aviva Chomsky, Dave Cooper, Walter Davis, Meredith Dean, Elizabeth C. Fine, Jenrose Fitzgerald, Doug Gamble, Nina Gregg, Edna Gulley, Molly Hemstreet, Mary Hufford, Ralph Hutchison, Donna Jones, Ann Kingsolver, Sue Ella Kobak, Jill Kriesky, Michael E. Maloney, Lisa Markowitz, Linda McKinney, Ladelle McWhorter, Marta Maria Miranda, Chad Montrie, Maureen Mullinax, Phillip J. Obermiller, Rebecca O'Doherty, Cassie Robinson Pfleger, Randal Pfleger, Anita Puckett, Katie Richards-Schuster, June Rostan, Rees Shearer, Daniel Swan, Joe Szakos, Betsy Taylor, Thomas E. Wagner, Craig White, and Ryan Wishart.
Category: History

Who Governs

Author : Robert Alan Dahl
ISBN : 0300103921
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 77.29 MB
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In this work, one of the most celebrated political scientists of the 20th century offers a powerful interpretation of the location of political power in American urban communities.
Category: Political Science

Democracy In Translation

Author : Frederic Charles Schaffer
ISBN : 0801486912
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 65.54 MB
Format : PDF
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Frederic C. Schaffer challenges the assumption often made by American scholars that democracy has been achieved in foreign countries when criteria such as free elections are met. Elections, he argues, often have cultural underpinnings that are invisible to outsiders. To examine grassroots understandings of democratic institutions and political concepts, Schaffer conducted fieldwork in Senegal, a mostly Islamic and agrarian country with a long history of electoral politics. Schaffer discovered that ideas of "demokaraasi" held by Wolof-speakers often reflect concerns about collective security. Many Senegalese see voting as less a matter of choosing leaders than of reinforcing community ties that may be called upon in times of crisis.By looking carefully at language, Schaffer demonstrates that institutional arrangements do not necessarily carry the same meaning in different cultural contexts. Democracy in Translation asks how social scientists should investigate the functioning of democratic institutions in cultures dissimilar from their own, and raises larger issues about the nature of democracy, the universality of democratic ideals, and the practice of cross-cultural research.
Category: Social Science

America The Unusual

Author : John W. Kingdon
ISBN : 031221734X
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 47.59 MB
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This book explores the uniqueness of the American system of government and how it acquired its distinctiveness.
Category: Political Science

The First American Frontier

Author : Wilma A. Dunaway
ISBN : 080784540X
Genre : History
File Size : 79.48 MB
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In The First American Frontier, Wilma Dunaway challenges many assumptions about the development of preindustrial Southern Appalachia's society and economy. Drawing on data from 215 counties in nine states from 1700 to 1860, she argues that capitali
Category: History

Putting Social Movements In Their Place

Author : Doug McAdam
ISBN : 9781107020665
Genre : Philosophy
File Size : 42.42 MB
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This book reports the results of a comparative study of twenty communities earmarked for environmentally risky energy projects.
Category: Philosophy

The Politics Of Judicial Independence

Author : Bruce Peabody
ISBN : 9780801897719
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 76.67 MB
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The judiciary in the United States has been subject in recent years to increasingly vocal, aggressive criticism by media members, activists, and public officials at the federal, state, and local level. This collection probes whether these attacks as well as proposals for reform represent threats to judicial independence or the normal, even healthy, operation of our political system. In addressing this central question, the volume integrates new scholarship, current events, and the perennial concerns of political science and law. The contributors—policy experts, established and emerging scholars, and attorneys—provide varied scholarly viewpoints and assess the issue of judicial independence from the diverging perspectives of Congress, the presidency, and public opinion. Through a diverse range of methodologies, the chapters explore the interactions and tensions among these three interests and the courts and discuss how these conflicts are expressed—and competing interests accommodated. In doing so, they ponder whether the U.S. courts are indeed experiencing anything new and whether anti-judicial rhetoric affords fresh insights. Case studies from Israel, the United Kingdom, and Australia provide a comparative view of judicial controversy in other democratic nations. A unique assessment of the rise of criticism aimed at the judiciary in the United States, The Politics of Judicial Independence is a well-organized and engagingly written text designed especially for students. Instructors of judicial process and judicial policymaking will find the book, along with the materials and resources on its accompanying website, readily adaptable for classroom use.
Category: Political Science