The Wages Of Whiteness

Author : David R. Roediger
ISBN : 1859842402
Genre : History
File Size : 54.22 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 165
Read : 544

THE WAGES OF WHITENESS provides an original study of the formative years of working-class racism in the United States. In an Afterword to this second edition, Roediger discusses recent studies of whiteness and the changing face of labor itself--then surveys criticism of his work. He accepts the views of some critics but challenges others.
Category: History

Brot Und Gerechtigkeit

Author : Hinnerk Onken
ISBN : 9783643123961
Genre : Arequipa (Peru)
File Size : 31.46 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 807
Read : 1054

Category: Arequipa (Peru)

Towards The Abolition Of Whiteness

Author : David R. Roediger
ISBN : 0860916588
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 33.49 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 768
Read : 1154

Towards the Abolition of Whiteness collects David Roediger's recent essays, many published here for the first time, and counts the costs of whiteness in the past and present of the US. It finds those costs insupportable. At a time when prevailing liberal wisdom argues for the downplaying of race in the hope of building coalitions dedicated to economic reform, Roediger wants to open, not close, debates on the privileges and miseries associated with being white. He closely examines the way in which white identities have historically prepared white Americans to accept the oppression of others, the emptiness of their own lives, and the impossibility of change. Whether discussing popular culture, race and ethnicity, the evolution of such American keywords as gook, boss and redneck, the strikes of 1877 or the election of 1992, Roediger pushes at the boundaries between labor history and politics, as well as those between race and class. Alive to tension within what James Baldwin called "the lie of whiteness," Roediger explores the record of dissent from white identity, especially in the cultural realm, and encourages the search for effective political challenges to whiteness.
Category: Political Science

A Respectable Woman

Author : Jane E. Dabel
ISBN : 9780814720110
Genre : History
File Size : 49.4 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 194
Read : 261

In the nineteenth century, New York City underwent a tremendous demographic transformation driven by European immigration, the growth of a native-born population, and the expansion of one of the largest African American communities in the North. New York's free blacks were extremely politically active, lobbying for equal rights at home and an end to Southern slavery. As their activism increased, so did discrimination against them, most brutally illustrated by bloody attacks during the 1863 New York City Draft Riots. The struggle for civil rights did not extend to equal gender roles, and black male leaders encouraged women to remain in the domestic sphere, serving as caretakers, moral educators, and nurses to their families and community. Yet as Jane E. Dabel demonstrates, separate spheres were not a reality for New York City's black people, who faced dire poverty, a lopsided sex ratio, racialized violence, and a high mortality rate, all of which conspired to prevent men from gaining respectable employment and political clout. Consequently, many black women came out of the home and into the streets to work, build networks with other women, and fight against racial injustice. A Respectable Woman reveals the varied and powerful lives led by black women, who, despite the exhortations of male reformers, occupied public roles as gender and race reformers.
Category: History

The Oxford Handbook Of African American Citizenship 1865 Present

Author : Henry Louis Gates
ISBN : 9780195188059
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 79.15 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 878
Read : 1222

The Oxford Handbook of African American Citizenship, 1865-Present seeks to answer the question of what the United States would look like today if, at the end of the Civil War, freed slaves had been granted full political, social and economic rights. Over the course of thirty-four chapters, written by some of the most eminent scholars of African American studies and across every major social discipline, this Handbook presents a full and powerful portrait of the particular hurdles faced by African Americans and the distinctive contributions African Americans have made to the development of U.S. institutions and culture.
Category: Political Science

Labor Is Not A Commodity

Author : Philipp Reick
ISBN : 9783593506272
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 44.65 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 470
Read : 325

Analyzing the history of the movement to shorten the workday in late nineteenth-century New York City and Berlin, this book explores what Karl Polanyi has termed the "fictitious commodification" of labor. Despite the concept's significance for present-day social movements, European and North American historiography has largely ignored the impact of free-market rhetoric on the formation of organized labor. Filling this gap, Philipp Reick provides both a contribution to the current reevaluation of Polanyian thought and theory and an interdisciplinary investigation of the trans-Atlantic transmission of ideas. As Reick demonstrates, while on both sides of the Atlantic workers opposed the unchecked commodification of labor power as a violation of their political, social, and economic rights, the emerging movements for protection from commodification did not promote a universalist concept of rights. By showing that American and German workers drew upon a strikingly similar rationality when formulating demands, this book reveals that we cannot label either the US labor movement as a deviation from the supposed norm of industrial contestation or its German counterpart as the embodiment of that norm.
Category: Social Science

The Rise And Fall Of The White Republic

Author : Alexander Saxton
ISBN : 1859844677
Genre : History
File Size : 64.86 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 937
Read : 967

Saxton asks why white racism remained an ideological force in America long after the need to justify slavery and Western conquest had disappeared.
Category: History

Religion And American Cultures Tradition Diversity And Popular Expression 2nd Edition 4 Volumes

Author : Gary Laderman
ISBN : 9781610691109
Genre : History
File Size : 59.25 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 951
Read : 543

This four-volume work provides a detailed, multicultural survey of established as well as "new" American religions and investigates the fascinating interactions between religion and ethnicity, gender, politics, regionalism, ethics, and popular culture. • Comprises contributions from more than 100 top scholars covering a breadth of topics such as Día de los Muertos, Heathenry, Islam, Pentecostalism, roadside shrines, Sufism, Wicca, and Zen from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives • Provides thought-provoking insights into religion's interactions with cultural backdrops throughout America, including in education, entertainment, the Internet, the environment, politics, and at home • Contains photographs and illustrations depicting a wide range of religious figures and activities as well as significant religious sites in the United States • Supplies an entire volume of primary source documents illustrating the religious diversity in American culture, including Cecil B. DeMille's essay "The Screen as Religious Teacher" as well as more conventional materials on Christian Science, the New Age, and Buddhism
Category: History

In Mixed Company

Author : Julia Roberts
ISBN : 9780774858670
Genre : History
File Size : 50.31 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 844
Read : 162

In Mixed Company explores taverns as colonial public space and how men and women of diverse backgrounds � Native and newcomer, privileged and labouring, white and non-white � negotiated a place for themselves within them. The stories that emerge unsettle comfortable certainties about who belonged where in colonial society. Colonial taverns were places where labourers enjoyed libations with wealthy Aboriginal traders like Captain Thomas, who also treated a Scotsman to a small bowl of punch; where white soldiers rubbed shoulders with black colonists out to celebrate Emancipation Day; where English ladies and their small children sought refuge for a night. The records of the past tell stories of time spent in mixed company but also of the myriad, unequal ways that colonists found room in taverns and a place in Upper Canadian culture and society. Reconstructed from tavern-keepers' accounts, court records, diaries, travelogues, and letters, In Mixed Company is essential reading for tavern aficionados and anyone interested in the history of gender, race, and culture in Canadian or colonial society.
Category: History

The Boy Problem

Author : Julia Grant
ISBN : 9781421412603
Genre : Education
File Size : 89.69 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 185
Read : 883

America’s educational system has a problem with boys, and it’s nothing new. The question of what to do with boys—the "boy problem"—has vexed educators and social commentators for more than a century. Contemporary debates about poor academic performance of boys, especially those of color, point to a myriad of reasons: inadequate and punitive schools, broken families, poverty, and cultural conflicts. Julia Grant offers a historical perspective on these debates and reveals that it is a perennial issue in American schooling that says much about gender and education today. Since the birth of compulsory schooling, educators have contended with what exactly to do with boys of immigrant, poor, minority backgrounds. Initially, public schools developed vocational education and organized athletics and technical schools as well as evening and summer continuation schools in response to the concern that the American culture of masculinity devalued academic success in school. Urban educators sought ways to deal with the "bad boys"—almost exclusively poor, immigrant, or migrant—who skipped school, exhibited behavioral problems when they attended, and sometimes landed in special education classes and reformatory institutions. The problems these boys posed led to accommodations in public education and juvenile justice system. This historical study sheds light on contemporary concerns over the academic performance of boys of color who now flounder in school or languish in the juvenile justice system. Grant's cogent analysis will interest education policy-makers and educators, as well as scholars of the history of education, childhood, gender studies, American studies, and urban history. -- Jonathan Zimmerman, author of Small Wonder: The Little Red Schoolhouse in History and Memory
Category: Education