Where Peachtree Meets Sweet Auburn

Author : Gary M. Pomerantz
ISBN : 0140265090
Genre : History
File Size : 88.47 MB
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Examines the history of Atlanta through the defining prism of race in the stories of two prominent Atlanta families
Category: History

Sprawl City

Author : Robert Bullard
ISBN : 1610913523
Genre : Architecture
File Size : 79.81 MB
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A serious but often overlooked impact of the random, unplanned growth commonly known as sprawl is its effect on economic and racial polarization. Sprawl-fueled growth pushes people further apart geographically, politically, economically, and socially. Atlanta, Georgia, one of the fastest-growing areas in the country, offers a striking example of sprawl-induced stratification.Sprawl City uses a multi-disciplinary approach to analyze and critique the emerging crisis resulting from urban sprawl in the ten-county Atlanta metropolitan region. Local experts including sociologists, lawyers, urban planners, economists, educators, and health care professionals consider sprawl-related concerns as core environmental justice and civil rights issues.Contributors focus on institutional constraints that are embedded in urban sprawl, considering how government housing, education, and transportation policies have aided and in some cases subsidized separate but unequal economic development and segregated neighborhoods. They offer analysis of the causes and consequences of urban sprawl, and outline policy recommendations and an action agenda for coping with sprawl-related problems, both in Atlanta and around the country.Contributors are Natalie Brown, Robert D. Bullard, William W. Buzbee, James Chapman, Dennis Creech, Russell W. Irvine, Charles Jaret, Chad G. Johnson, Glenn S. Johnson, Kurt Phillips, Elizabeth P. Ruddiman, and Angel O. Torres.The book illuminates the rising class and racial divisions underlying uneven growth and development, and provides a timely source of information for anyone concerned with those issues, including the growing environmental justice movement as well as planners, policy analysts, public officials, community leaders, and students of public policy, geography, or planning.
Category: Architecture

Atlanta

Author : Larry Keating
ISBN : 1566398215
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 45.52 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Atlanta, the epitome of the New South, is a city whose economic growth has transformed it from a provincial capital to a global city, one that could bid for and win the 1996 Summer Olympics. Yet the reality is that the exceptional growth of the region over the last twenty years has exacerbated inequality, particularly for African Americans. Atlanta, the city of Martin Luther King, Jr., remains one of the most segregated cities in the United States. Despite African American success in winning the mayor's office and control of the City Council, development plans have remained in the control of private business interests. Keating tells a number of troubling stories. The development of the Underground Atlanta, the construction of the rapid rail system (MARTA), the building of a new stadium for the Braves, the redevelopment of public housing, and the arrangements for the Olympic Games all share a lack of democratic process. Business and political elites ignored protests from neighborhood groups, the interests of the poor, and the advice of planners.
Category: Political Science

Race And The Shaping Of Twentieth Century Atlanta

Author : Ronald H. Bayor
ISBN : 0807848980
Genre : History
File Size : 86.98 MB
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Offering the first comprehensive history of Atlanta race relations, Ronald Bayor discusses the impact of racial bias on physical and institutional development of the city from the end of the Civil War through the mayorship of Andrew Young in the 1980s. Bayor explores frequently ignored policy issues through the lens of race--including hospital care, highway placement and development, police and fire services, schools, and park use, as well as housing patterns and employment.
Category: History

Women Activists In The Fight For Georgia School Desegregation 1958 1961

Author : Rebecca H. Dartt
ISBN : 9780786438433
Genre : Education
File Size : 42.74 MB
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"In 1958, groups of dedicated mothers began grassroots meetings that soon spread throughout Georgia, eventually culminating in the formation of Help Our Public Education (HOPE, Inc.). This is the history of the women's movement that was integral in desegregating Georgia schools"--Provided by publisher.
Category: Education

Darktown

Author : Thomas Mullen
ISBN : 9781501133862
Genre : Fiction
File Size : 42.59 MB
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"Responding to orders from on high, the Atlanta Police Department is forced to hire its first black officers, including war veterans Lucius Boggs and Tommy Smith. The newly minted policemen are met with deep hostility by their white peers: they aren't allowed to arrest white suspects, drive squad cars, or set foot in the police headquarters. When a black woman who was last seen in a car driven by a white man turns up dead, Boggs and Smith suspect white cops are behind it. Their investigation sets them up against a brutal cop, Dunlow, who has long run the neighborhood as his own, and his partner, Rakestraw, a young progressive who may or may not be willing to make allies across color lines"--Amazon.com.
Category: Fiction

Atlanta

Author : Andy Ambrose
ISBN : 1588180867
Genre : History
File Size : 60.60 MB
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Filled with images from Atlanta's archives, this short history features the personalities and locales of the economic and cultural capital of the Southeast. At its founding in 1837, Atlanta was filled with saloons and brothels, such that it was more like an Old West frontier town than a white-gloved city of the Old South. Highlighting the city's rebirth from the devastation of the Atlanta Campaign to its renaissance beginning in the 1960s, Atlanta's troubling racialized past is underscored, and the city's historically rich neighborhoods, including Ansley Park, Buckhead, and Druid Hills, are celebrated.
Category: History

Of War And Men

Author : Ralph LaRossa
ISBN : 9780226467436
Genre : FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS
File Size : 60.45 MB
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Fathers in the fifties tend to be portrayed as wise and genial pipe-smokers or distant, emotionless patriarchs. This common but limited stereotype obscures the remarkable diversity of their experiences and those of their children. To uncover the real story of fatherhood during this transformative era, Ralph LaRossa takes the long view—from the attack on Pearl Harbor up to the election of John F. Kennedy—revealing the myriad ways that World War II and its aftermath shaped men. Offering compelling accounts of people both ordinary and extraordinary, Of War and Men digs deep into the terrain of fatherhood. LaRossa explores the nature and aftereffects of combat, the culture of fear during the Cold War, the ways that fear altered the lives of racial and sexual minorities, and how the civil rights movement affected families both black and white. Overturning some calcified myths, LaRossa also analyzes the impact of suburbanization on fathers and their kids, discovering that living in the suburbs often strengthened their bond. And finally, looking beyond the idealized dad enshrined in TV sitcoms, Of War and Men explores the brutal side of family life in the postwar years. LaRossa’s richly researched book dismantles stereotypes while offering up a fascinating and incisive chronicle of fatherhood in all its complexity.
Category: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS

Imagineering Atlanta

Author : Charles Rutheiser
ISBN : 1859841457
Genre : History
File Size : 64.79 MB
Format : PDF
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Chronicles the city's efforts to create a sense of "traditional urbanity" and bolster the economy and culture of the city's core in the face of racialized topography in preparation for the Olympic games
Category: History

Their Life S Work

Author : Gary M. Pomerantz
ISBN : 9781451691641
Genre : Sports & Recreation
File Size : 83.48 MB
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“The definitive book of the 1970s Pittsburgh Steelers” (Scott Brown, ESPN): A unique literary sports book that—through exquisite reportage, love, and honesty—tells the full story of the best team to ever play the game. The Pittsburgh Steelers of the 1970s won an unprecedented and unmatched four Super Bowls in six years. A dozen of those Steelers players, coaches, and executives have been inducted into the Hall of Fame, and three decades later their names echo in popular memory: “Mean” Joe Greene, Terry Bradshaw, Franco Harris, Mike Webster, Jack Lambert, Lynn Swann, and John Stallworth. In ways exhilarating and heartbreaking, they define not only the brotherhood of sports but those elements of the game that engage tens of millions of Americans: its artistry and its brutality. Drawing on hundreds of interviews, Their Life’s Work is a richly textured story of a team and a sport, what the game gave these men, and what the game took. It gave fame, wealth, and, above all, a brotherhood of players, twelve of whom died before turning sixty. To a man, they said they’d do it again, all of it. They bared the soul of the game to Gary Pomerantz, and he captured it wondrously. “Here is a book as hard-hitting and powerful as the ‘Steel Curtain’ dynasty that Pomerantz depicts so deftly. It’s the NFL’s version of The Boys of Summer, with equal parts triumph and melancholy. Pomerantz’s writing is strong, straightforward, funny, sentimental, and blunt. It’s as working class and gritty as the men he writes about” (The Tampa Tribune, Top 10 Sports Books of 2013).
Category: Sports & Recreation