Wounded City

Author : Robert Vargas
ISBN : 9780190245917
Genre : Ethnic neighborhoods
File Size : 74.86 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 547
Read : 834

In 2009, Chicago spent millions of dollars to create programs to prevent gang violence in some of its most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Yet in spite of the programs, violence has grown worse in some of the very neighborhoods that the violence prevention programs were intented to help. While public officials and social scientists often attribute the violence - and the failure of the programs - to a lack of community in poor neighborhoods, closer study reveals another source of community division: local politics. Through an ethnographic case study of Chicago's Little Village neighborhood, Wounded City dispells the popular belief that a lack of community is the primary source of violence, arguing that competition for political power and state resources often undermine efforts to reduce gang violence. Robert Vargas argues that the state, through the way it governs, can contribute to distrust and division among community members, thereby undermining social cohesion. The strategic actions taken by police officers, politicians, nonprofit organizations, and gangs to collaborate or compete for power and resources can vary block by block, triggering violence on some blocks while successfully preventing it on others. A rich blend of urban politics, sociology, and criminology, Wounded City offers a cautionary tale for elected officials, state agencies, and community based organizations involved with poor neighborhoods.
Category: Ethnic neighborhoods

Wounded City

Author : Robert Vargas
ISBN : 9780190245924
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 89.28 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 440
Read : 190

In 2009, Chicago spent millions of dollars to create programs to prevent gang violence in some of its most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Yet in spite of the programs, violence has grown worse in some of the very neighborhoods that the violence prevention programs were intented to help. While public officials and social scientists often attribute the violence - and the failure of the programs - to a lack of community in poor neighborhoods, closer study reveals another source of community division: local politics. Through an ethnographic case study of Chicago's Little Village neighborhood, Wounded City dispells the popular belief that a lack of community is the primary source of violence, arguing that competition for political power and state resources often undermine efforts to reduce gang violence. Robert Vargas argues that the state, through the way it governs, can contribute to distrust and division among community members, thereby undermining social cohesion. The strategic actions taken by police officers, politicians, nonprofit organizations, and gangs to collaborate or compete for power and resources can vary block by block, triggering violence on some blocks while successfully preventing it on others. A rich blend of urban politics, sociology, and criminology, Wounded City offers a cautionary tale for elected officials, state agencies, and community based organizations involved with poor neighborhoods.
Category: Social Science

Wounded City

Author : Robert Vargas
ISBN : 9780190245931
Genre : Social Science
File Size : 32.75 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 554
Read : 1053

In 2009, Chicago spent millions of dollars to create programs to prevent gang violence in some of its most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Yet in spite of the programs, violence has grown worse in some of the very neighborhoods that the violence prevention programs were intented to help. While public officials and social scientists often attribute the violence - and the failure of the programs - to a lack of community in poor neighborhoods, closer study reveals another source of community division: local politics. Through an ethnographic case study of Chicago's Little Village neighborhood, Wounded City dispells the popular belief that a lack of community is the primary source of violence, arguing that competition for political power and state resources often undermine efforts to reduce gang violence. Robert Vargas argues that the state, through the way it governs, can contribute to distrust and division among community members, thereby undermining social cohesion. The strategic actions taken by police officers, politicians, nonprofit organizations, and gangs to collaborate or compete for power and resources can vary block by block, triggering violence on some blocks while successfully preventing it on others. A rich blend of urban politics, sociology, and criminology, Wounded City offers a cautionary tale for elected officials, state agencies, and community based organizations involved with poor neighborhoods.
Category: Social Science

Gentrification

Author : Loretta Lees
ISBN : 9781135930257
Genre : Architecture
File Size : 40.86 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 168
Read : 332

This first textbook on the topic of gentrification is written for upper-level undergraduates in geography, sociology, and planning. The gentrification of urban areas has accelerated across the globe to become a central engine of urban development, and it is a topic that has attracted a great deal of interest in both academia and the popular press. Gentrification presents major theoretical ideas and concepts with case studies, and summaries of the ideas in the book as well as offering ideas for future research.
Category: Architecture

Social Justice In Diverse Suburbs

Author : Christopher Niedt
ISBN : 9781439910511
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 89.93 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 995
Read : 623

American suburbs have been seen as both exclusive idylls for elites as well as crucibles for new ideologies of gender, class, race, and property. But few have considered what the growing diversity of suburban America has meant for progressive social, economic, and political justice movements. Social Justice in Diverse Suburbs is a pioneering and multidisciplinary volume that reassesses commonplace understandings of suburban activism. Editor Christopher Niedt and his contributors shed light on organizing and conflict in the suburbs with historical and contemporary case studies. Chapters address topical issues ranging from how suburbanites actively fought school segregation to industrial pollution and displacement along the suburban-rural fringe. Social Justice in Diverse Suburbs also considers struggles for integration and environmental justice as well as efforts to preserve suburban history and organize immigrant communities. Contributors include: Douglas R. Appler, Aaron Cavin, Nancy A. Denton, Lisa Feldstein, Casey Gallagher, Anne Galletta, Joseph Gibbons, Robert Gioielli, Lucas Owen Kirkpatrick, JoAnna Mitchell-Brown, Manuel Pastor, john a. powell, Jason Reece, Alex Schafran, June Williamson, and the editor.
Category: Political Science

Women In War

Author : Jocelyn Viterna
ISBN : 9780199843657
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 64.57 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
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Women in War provides an in-depth analysis of women's experiences in the FMLN guerrilla army in El Salvador, and examines the consequences of those experiences for their post war lives. It also develops a new model for investigating and understanding micro-level mobilization processes that has applications to many social movement settings.
Category: Political Science

Social Work And Social Justice

Author : Charles D. Garvin
ISBN : 9780199893010
Genre : Social justice
File Size : 43.7 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 836
Read : 1186

Social Work and Social Justice emphasizes the importance of social justice work, vividly illustrates the complexity of this work, and discusses how social workers can negotiate the practical and ethical challenges involved. Unlike many books on the subject, it integrates a diverse array ofapproaches to social justice, thereby promoting critical thinking and underscoring the value of utilizing various perspectives in one's practice. Distinguishing features of this book include: emphasis on the complementary nature of socially just goals and processes; well-developed case examples; multi-disciplinary, multi-cultural, and international perspectives; a clear exposition of principles and skills of socially just practice; and theuse of diverse cultural materials from different media to illustrate the concepts presented. This text is largely based on the authors' extensive teaching and practice experience in a wide variety of fields - both in the U.S. and internationally - and on their research on such varied topics as welfare reform, mental health, social work practice theory, social work values and ethics, and thehistory and philosophy of social welfare and social work. Social Work and Social Justice is an essential resource for undergraduate and graduate students/faculty, as well as social work/human services practictioners.
Category: Social justice

Brown In The Windy City

Author : Lilia Fernández
ISBN : 9780226244259
Genre : History
File Size : 38.80 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 439
Read : 1058

Brown in the Windy City is the first history to examine the migration and settlement of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans in postwar Chicago. Lilia Fernández reveals how the two populations arrived in Chicago in the midst of tremendous social and economic change and, in spite of declining industrial employment and massive urban renewal projects, managed to carve out a geographic and racial place in one of America’s great cities. Through their experiences in the city’s central neighborhoods over the course of these three decades, Fernández demonstrates how Mexicans and Puerto Ricans collectively articulated a distinct racial position in Chicago, one that was flexible and fluid, neither black nor white.
Category: History

Down Out And Under Arrest

Author : Forrest Stuart
ISBN : 9780226370811
Genre : Political Science
File Size : 26.78 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 370
Read : 458

Forrest Stuart gives us a new framework for understanding life in criminalized communities throughout America. The idea of community policing and of stop-and-frisk and broken windows is just part of the picture, which includes people on both sides of the issue of keeping order in Skid Row communities. Stuart s is a dramatic demonstration of how to understand the daily realities of America s most truly disadvantaged, an understanding that requires a sharp focus on the pervasive role and impact of the police. Policing zero tolerance models in particularis reshaping urban poverty and marginalization in 21st-century America. Stuart immersed himself for several years in the notorious homeless capital of America, which is to say, Skid Row in Los Angeles. It has the largest concentration of standing police forces anywhere in the United States. On their side, the police practice what Stuart calls therapeutic policing a form of virtual social work that is designed to cure the poor of individual pathologies. On the side of the homeless, Stuart finds a cunning set of techniques for evading police contact, which he dubs cop wisdom and which the poor use for intensifying resistance to roustings by the police. The police are tasked with day-to-day management of the growing numbers of citizens falling through the holes in the threadbare social safety net. We see daily patrol practices and routines that amount to hyper-policing in skid row districts. The continuous threat of punishment aims to steer homeless individuals away from self-destructive behaviors while providing incentives to drug recovery, employment, and life skills (in nearby meta-shelters). Minority upheavals now underway across America underscore the divide between cops and the urban poor (almost all of whom are black or Latino). Stuart joins Alice Goffman in revealing the underlying, and often tragic, dynamics."
Category: Political Science

Chicago S Block Clubs

Author : Amanda I. Seligman
ISBN : 9780226385990
Genre : History
File Size : 85.24 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 485
Read : 570

What do you do if your alley is strewn with garbage after the sanitation truck comes through? Or if you’re tired of the rowdy teenagers next door keeping you up all night? Is there a vacant lot on your block accumulating weeds, needles, and litter? For a century, Chicagoans have joined block clubs to address problems like these that make daily life in the city a nuisance. When neighbors work together in block clubs, playgrounds get built, local crime is monitored, streets are cleaned up, and every summer is marked by the festivities of day-long block parties. In Chicago’s Block Clubs, Amanda I. Seligman uncovers the history of the block club in Chicago—from its origins in the Urban League in the early 1900s through to the Chicago Police Department’s twenty-first-century community policing program. Recognizing that many neighborhood problems are too big for one resident to handle—but too small for the city to keep up with—city residents have for more than a century created clubs to establish and maintain their neighborhood’s particular social dynamics, quality of life, and appearance. Omnipresent yet evanescent, block clubs are sometimes the major outlets for community organizing in the city—especially in neighborhoods otherwise lacking in political strength and clout. Drawing on the stories of hundreds of these groups from across the city, Seligman vividly illustrates what neighbors can—and cannot—accomplish when they work together.
Category: History